January/February 2005

Richard A. Clarke, "Ten Years Later"; James Fallows, "Success Without Victory"; William Langewiesche, "Letter From Baghdad"; Sridhar Pappu, "What Amy Would Do"; Walter Kirn, "Lost in the Meritocracy"; The Annual "State of the Union" Report; Jeffrey Tayler, "Russia's Holy Warriors"; Tom Carson, "The Murdoch Touch"; fiction by Anna North; and much more.

The Atlantic - January/February 2005

Also in this issue

Letters to the editor

Calendar

What to watch for in January and February

Other articles in this issue

Black Lamb and Grey Falcon: Part IV

Violence was indeed all I knew of the Balkans,' writes Rebecca West, 'all I knew of the South Slavs. And since there proceeds steadily from the southeastern corner of Europe a stream of events which are a danger to me, which indeed for years threatened my safety and deprived me forever of many benefits, that is to say I know nothing of my own destiny. The Balkan Peninsula was only two or three days distant, yet I had never troubled to go that short journey, which might explain to me how I shall die, and why.' So it was that in 1937 Rebecca West, with her husband, set out to explore the Balkans, and particularly Yugoslavia, to see for herself why the fate of the Continent and of England has so often been threatened by the Powderkeg of Europe. The story she brought back with her annihilates distance, and touches every thoughtful reader.

Black Lamb and Grey Falcon: Part V

Violence was indeed all I knew of the Balkans,' writes Rebecca West, 'all I knew of the South Slavs. And since there proceeds steadily from the southeastern corner of Europe a stream of events which are a danger to me, which indeed for years threatened my safety and deprived me forever of many benefits, that is to say I know nothing of my own destiny. The Balkan Peninsula was only two or three days distant, yet I had never troubled to go that short journey, which might explain to me how I shall die, and why.' So it was that in 1937 Rebecca West, with her husband, set out to explore the Balkans, and particularly Yugoslavia, to see for herself why the fate of the Continent and of England has so often been threatened by the Powderkeg of Europe. The story she brought back with her annihilates distance, and touches every thoughtful reader.

Poetry

A Place for the Bees

(from Virgil's Georgics) [with audio]

Retrospective

[with audio]

Features

Ten Years Later

"Then the second wave of al-Qaeda attacks hit America." A leading expert on counterterrorism imagines the future history of the war on terror. A frightening picture of a country still at war in 2011
Interviews: Richard Clarke talks about his frightening scenario of an America hobbled by terrorism—and what we can do to avoid it

Success Without Victory

A "containment" strategy for the age of terror

Letter From Baghdad

Life in the wilds of a city without trust

What Amy Would Do

Meet Amy Dickinson, agony aunt for the twenty-first century

Lost in the Meritocracy

How I traded an education for a ticket to the ruling class

Bipolar Disorder

A funny thing happened to many of the scholars who went out into the country to investigate the red-blue divide. They couldn't find it

Shaken and Stirred

The United States is about to experience economic upheaval on a scale unseen for generations. Will social harmony be a casualty?

Beyond Belief

The real religious divide in the United States isn't between the churched and the unchurched. It's between different kinds of believers

The Massless Media

With the mass media losing their audience to smaller, more targeted outlets, we may be headed for an era of noisy, contentious press reminiscent of the 1800s

Continental Divides

The Crescent of Crime, the Spousal Spine, the Divorce Coasts, the Righteous Region, and other sources of national greatness

Field Guide

A poetry anthology
Poetry: [with audio]
Poetry: [with audio]
Poetry: [with audio]

A Record Book for Small Farmers

Had her father been a coward all these years, his reticence a cover for things he was afraid to say?

Agenda

Clintonism, R.I.P.

How triangulation became strangulation

The Widening Atlantic

Our growing transatlantic estrangement has less to do with George W. Bush's foreign policy than with deep social changes in Europe

Redheaded Eskimo

The corporate tax bill—an explanation

Letting Go of Roe

Roe v. Wade has been deeply unhealthy for abortion rights—and for democracy

Primary Sources

How car insurance causes death; the Brits and foreplay; how long could you survive without the Internet?

A Muslim Europe?

[This article is unavailable online.]

Books

An Exquisite Slogger

V. S. Pritchett, by Jeremy Treglown; Born Losers, by Scott A. Sandage; War in the Wild East, by Ben Shepherd

The Murdoch Touch

If Rupert's so bad, why is Fox so good?

Darling Me

Christopher Isherwood followed Oscar Wilde's prescription for lifelong romance by falling in love with himself—over and over again

A Nice Bloody Fool

Beneath the surface the vaguely preposterous Stephen Spender had a pith of seriousness and principle

Easier Said Than Done

Five novels by critics who learned their lesson

Chameleon With a Toupee

Bobby Darin was so determined to be somebody that he tried to be everybody

Villages, by John Updike

Appraising the substance of style

Pursuits

People to People

Some say that liberals and conservatives need to build bridges of understanding. Drawbridges might be better

45 Years Ago in The Atlantic

"The Job of the Washington Correspondent"

X Jazz

The pianist Matthew Shipp is the star of the latter-day free-jazz scene—the only scene in jazz right now with younger faces in the audience

Russia's Holy Warriors

Fervently Orthodox, anti-Islamic, and proudly militaristic, the Cossacks are on the rise in Vladimir Putin's new Russia

Who's Who

A selective index to this month's issue


Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

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Down

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