July/August 2004 Issue

James Fallows, "When George Meets John"; Joshua Green, "Dumb and Dumber"; Mark Bowden, "Pompadour With a Monkey Wrench"; Joshua Micah Marshall, "Kerry Faces the World"; Robert D. Kaplan, "Five Days in Fallujah"; Benjamin Wittes, "Enemy Americans"; William F. Buckley, Jr., "Aweigh"; P. J. O'Rourke, "I Agree With Me"; fiction by Robert Olen Butler; and much more.




  • New & Noteworthy

    Landon Carter's Uneasy Kingdom, by Rhys Isaac; Hatchet Jobs, by Dale Peck; The North American Prairie, by Stephen R. Jones and Ruth Carol Cushman; The Crow Indians, by Robert H. Lowie; War Under Heaven, by Gregory Evans Dowd; Europe's Last Summer: Who Started the Great War in 1914?, by David Fromkin; The First World War, by Hew Strachan; Cataclysm: The First World War as Political Tragedy, by David Stevenson; The Killing Ground, by Tim Travers

  • The Kids Are All Right

    Teens aren't as warped as some of the books about them

  • The Old Man

    Even for educated readers, Leon Trotsky survives as part kitsch and part caricature. But the reissue of a majestic biography reveals him as he always was—a prophetic moralist

  • Odd Couple

    Susan Sontag and Pauline Kael: a curious combination

  • Laff Tracks

    Four Souls, by Louise Erdrich.

  • The Terrors

    One of the foremost scholars of Soviet history assesses an ambitious new biography of Stalin


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