June 1998

Christopher Caldwell, “The Southern Captivity of the GOP”; Murray Sayle, “The Social Contradictions of Japanese Capitalism”; Roy Blount, “That Was Me on TV”; Elizabeth Stuckey-French, “Electric Wizard”; and much more.

  • Good News and Bad News About Breast Cancer

    Women are more alarmed than they need to be about the chances that they will develop breast cancer. But they are also more confident than they should be that the advances medicine has made in treating the disease and prolonging life mean that it can be cured

  • The Southern Captivity of the GOP

    In a geographic and cultural box, with political demography tilting against it, the Republican Party is an "obsolescent one," argues the author, a senior writer for the conservative

  • The Social Contradictions of Japanese Capitalism

    Behind the bad economic news from Japan, the writer argues, is a worse social crisis—one he witnesses daily in microcosm in the Japanese village where he lives

  • A Good Climate for Investment

    Reducing reliance on carbon for energy -- to safeguard our atmosphere and our climate -- could bring about not personal deprivation but a worldwide economic boom

  • That Was Me On TV

    Life in the last, or next-to-last, slot

  • Moving the Bell

    Soon America's most venerated icon will have a new, and more appropriate, home

  • Electric Wizard

    They sat calmly, waiting to hear Jason's poem, and the weight of what had happened to them hung heavily in the room. I hoped they'd start fighting again

  • Beyond Prague

    Where to slake a thirst for fairy-tale architecture -- among other Czech specialities

  • Better Butter

    An intentional and elusive sourness heightens butter's natural sweetness -- and makes it worthy of being the featured rather than the supporting player

  • Discovering Young Poets

    How some of the best-known poets of this century got that way

  • How McKinley Begot Franco

    A HUNDRED years ago The Atlantic Monthly published "The Decadence of Spain," by the historian Henry Charles Lea. In ten pages Lea traced…

  • 77 North Washington Street

    THE surging Japanese economy was one of the big economic stories of the 1980s. Commentators often treated the subject in an allegorical way,…

  • Letters

    Back From Chaos. ValuJet 592 Californization. Back From Chaos I admire and am in sympathy with Edward O. Wilson's magisterial romp through…

  • The Almanac

    Government. June 1: The U.S. Treasury will receive for final approval the first of 50 new designs -- one for each state -- for the "tails" side…

  • At Last Count

    THE map above shows volume on the major telecommunication routes between the United States and other, noncontiguous nations. What is behind…

  • Word Improvisation

    Investigations of slang by the editor of the

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

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