March 1997

Peter Edelman, “The Worst Thing Bill Clinton Has Done”; Ezekiel Emanuel, “Whose Right to Die?”; Matthew Gurewitsch, “An Audubon in Sound”; Lester C. Thurow, “The Revolution Upon Us”; and much more.

  • Whose Right to Die?

    America should think again before pressing ahead with the legalization of physician-assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia

  • The Worst Thing Bill Clinton Has Done

    A Clinton appointee who resigned in protest over the new welfare law explains why it is so bad and suggestshow its worst effects could be mitigated.

  • What Jefferson Helps to Explain

    A recent article in these pages argued that Thomas Jefferson was so deeply racist that he should be expelled from the American pantheon. But examining the problems this ambiguous figure poses for Americans reveals how the American principles of democracy and equality were entwined with the country's practice of slavery and racism, and helps to explain why America has had such difficulty creating an interracial society.

  • A War That Never Ends

    The laws of grammar may be arbitrary, as those who would simply dismiss them assert. But arbitrary laws are just the ones that need enforcement.

  • And Now for the News

    The disturbing freshness of Gibbon's Decline and Fall.

  • Vigilance

    What's a dad to do in a world of sharp corners?

  • Welding With Children

    He was just one old man with a little brown book of Bible stories. How could he compete with MTV, the Playboy Channel, and rental movies where people kill each other with no more thought than it would take to swat a fly?

  • Short Circuit

  • British Islets

    The Isles of Scilly and the Channel Islands have the virtues of England--and some of their own.

  • An Audubon in Sound

    Messiaen's radiant birdsongs, the crown of his creation, belong as much to the artist as to nature

  • The Revolution Upon Us

    "All that is solid melts into air" -- Karl Marx could have been describing the forces unleashed by the first truly global economy.

  • The Laureate as Onlooker

    WHETHER or not they achieve permanent fame, certain poets speak for the sensibility of their era. We can even play the game of compiling a list of…

  • China's Strategic Culture

    A RECENT visitor from Singapore, an able and well-informed reporter from the Straits Times, wanted me to know that the people of East Asia were…

  • 77 North Washington Street

    IN signing the welfare bill that Peter Edelman deplores in this month's cover story, President Bill Clinton quoted a line from Robert F. Kennedy:…

  • Letters

    No-Frills Jesus. Magic Time. Immigration. Advice & Consent. No-Frills Jesus The article of mine that Charlotte Allen ("The …

  • The Almanac

    Government March 27: as of today female circumcision, or female genital mutilation, becomes illegal in the United States, according…

  • Word Court

    Ian before historian, historic, or historical. The rule regarding articles appears to be quite simple and straightforward: one uses a before…

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Magazine

More back issues, Sept 1995 to present.

Just In