January 1976

  • CBS: The Power and the Profits

    However the Toynbee or the Gibbon of the future adjudges what happened to American society, he will need to reckon large with the impact of radio and television. By the 1950s, TV had become the greatest new instrument of political and social influence in the nation. How that happened, how TV became both a shaper and a creature of politics, both a maker and a prisoner of public tastes, is most simply told as the story of one broadcasting network, of its founder and indomitable chairman, William S. Paley, and the men who helped make CBS into Paley's golden candy store. David Halberstam has written that story as part of a larger work in progress about centers of power in America and the ways they have been affected by science, technology, and modern communications. This is the first of two installments.

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A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

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The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

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This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

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What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

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