January 1976

  • CBS: The Power and the Profits

    However the Toynbee or the Gibbon of the future adjudges what happened to American society, he will need to reckon large with the impact of radio and television. By the 1950s, TV had become the greatest new instrument of political and social influence in the nation. How that happened, how TV became both a shaper and a creature of politics, both a maker and a prisoner of public tastes, is most simply told as the story of one broadcasting network, of its founder and indomitable chairman, William S. Paley, and the men who helped make CBS into Paley's golden candy store. David Halberstam has written that story as part of a larger work in progress about centers of power in America and the ways they have been affected by science, technology, and modern communications. This is the first of two installments.

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The Best 71-Second Animation You'll Watch Today

A rock monster tries to save a village from destruction.

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The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

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A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

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Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

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Stunning GoPro Footage of a Wildfire

In the field with America’s elite Native American firefighting crew

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