January 1976

  • CBS: The Power and the Profits

    However the Toynbee or the Gibbon of the future adjudges what happened to American society, he will need to reckon large with the impact of radio and television. By the 1950s, TV had become the greatest new instrument of political and social influence in the nation. How that happened, how TV became both a shaper and a creature of politics, both a maker and a prisoner of public tastes, is most simply told as the story of one broadcasting network, of its founder and indomitable chairman, William S. Paley, and the men who helped make CBS into Paley's golden candy store. David Halberstam has written that story as part of a larger work in progress about centers of power in America and the ways they have been affected by science, technology, and modern communications. This is the first of two installments.

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A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This short film takes you on a whirling tour of the Big Apple

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What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

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The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life

The Supreme Court justice talks gender equality and marriage.

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The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

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