March 1967

  • On the Writing of Contemporary History

    The country has widely discussed the so-called "management of news." The controversy over William Manchester's Death of a President, together with lesser contretemps over earlier books, about President Kennedy and his Administration, suggests a companion subject: the management of history. When do contemporary affairs become history? What are the responsibilities and obligations of those who propose to write that history and of those who help to make it? One man's view is conveyed in this elaboration of an address to the American Historical Association. Mr. Schlesinger writes both as a historian (The Age of Jackson, The Age of Roosevelt) and as a participant in many of the events recorded in his widely read A Thousand Days, a chronicle of John Kennedy's presidency.

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A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This short film takes you on a whirling tour of the Big Apple

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What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

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The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life

The Supreme Court justice talks gender equality and marriage.

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The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

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