October 1957

  • Science: Careers for Women

    The growing need for research workers and scientists has opened new doors for women. Helen Hill Miller, who for many years was Washington correspondent for the London Economist, describes some of the work being done in science both by single women and by those who successfully combine marriage and a career.

  • Mutations and Evolution

    Darwin's theory of natural selection, which was published practically simultaneously with the establisment of the ATLANTIC, opened new worlds to science. Dr. Evelyn Witkin, a brilliant young biologist at State University of New York College of Medicine in New York City, tells how genetics, a branch of science not yet born in Darwin's day, has carried forward our understanding of evolution.

  • Ladder to Nirvana

    A review of Jack Kerouac's On the Road

Video

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity

Video

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Magazine

More back issues, Sept 1995 to present.

Just In