March 1951

  • The Future of Man

    British philosopher and mathematician who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950, BERTRAND RUSSELL, in the paper that follows, calmly examines three foreseeable possibilities for the human race. In 1920 he paid a brief visit to Russia; he talked with Lenin and with other leaders, and what he saw of the government did not impress him favorably. He has been a frequent visitor to the United States and, while sometimes critical of us, he admits some hope for our way of doing things.

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CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity

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Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

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A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

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In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

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What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

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Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

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