March 1951

  • The Future of Man

    British philosopher and mathematician who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950, BERTRAND RUSSELL, in the paper that follows, calmly examines three foreseeable possibilities for the human race. In 1920 he paid a brief visit to Russia; he talked with Lenin and with other leaders, and what he saw of the government did not impress him favorably. He has been a frequent visitor to the United States and, while sometimes critical of us, he admits some hope for our way of doing things.

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How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

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Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

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The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

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Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

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Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

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Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

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