March 1927

  • The Case of Sacco and Vanzetti

    In 1921, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, both Italian-Americans, were convicted of robbery and murder. Although the arguments brought against them were mostly disproven in court, the fact that the two men were known radicals (and that their trial took place during the height of the Red Scare) prejudiced the judge and jury against them. On April 9, 1927, Sacco and Vanzetti's final appeal was rejected, and the two were sentenced to death. Felix Frankfurter, then a professor at Harvard Law School, was considered to be the most prominent and respectable critic of the trial. He was appointed to the Supreme Court by Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1939

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A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

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In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

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What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

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How Will Climate Change Affect Cities?

Urban planners and environmentalists predict the future of city life.

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The Inner Life of a Drag Queen

A short documentary about cross-dressing, masculinity, identity, and performance

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Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

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