July 1916

  • Trans-national America

    As World War I unfolded in Europe, intensifying ethnic antagonisms, native-born Americans became increasingly suspicious of the pockets of immigrant culture thriving among them. In 1916, critic and essayist Randolph Bourne challenged such attitudes with an essay—now considered a classic of forward thinking—calling for a new, more cosmopolitan conception of America and a reconsideration of the "melting-pot" theory

Video

Riding Unicycles in a Cave

"If you fall down and break your leg, there's no way out."

Video

Carrot: A Pitch-Perfect Satire of Tech

"It's not just a vegetable. It's what a vegetable should be."

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An Ingenious 360-Degree Time-Lapse

Watch the world become a cartoonishly small playground

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The Benefits of Living Alone on a Mountain

"You really have to love solitary time by yourself."

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The Rise of the Cat Tattoo

How a Brooklyn tattoo artist popularized the "cattoo"

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