July 1916

  • Trans-national America

    As World War I unfolded in Europe, intensifying ethnic antagonisms, native-born Americans became increasingly suspicious of the pockets of immigrant culture thriving among them. In 1916, critic and essayist Randolph Bourne challenged such attitudes with an essay—now considered a classic of forward thinking—calling for a new, more cosmopolitan conception of America and a reconsideration of the "melting-pot" theory

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Maine's Underground Street Art

"Graffiti is the farthest thing from anarchy."

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The Joy of Running in a Beautiful Place

A love letter to California's Marin Headlands

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'I Didn't Even Know What I Was Going Through'

A 17-year-old describes his struggles with depression.

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Google Street View, Transformed Into a Tiny Planet

A 360-degree tour of our world, made entirely from Google's panoramas

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The Farmer Who Won't Quit

A filmmaker returns to his hometown to profile the patriarch of a family farm

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Riding Unicycles in a Cave

"If you fall down and break your leg, there's no way out."

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Carrot: A Pitch-Perfect Satire of Tech

"It's not just a vegetable. It's what a vegetable should be."

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