July 1916

  • Trans-national America

    As World War I unfolded in Europe, intensifying ethnic antagonisms, native-born Americans became increasingly suspicious of the pockets of immigrant culture thriving among them. In 1916, critic and essayist Randolph Bourne challenged such attitudes with an essay—now considered a classic of forward thinking—calling for a new, more cosmopolitan conception of America and a reconsideration of the "melting-pot" theory

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The Horrors of Rat Hole Mining

"The river was our source of water. Now, the people won't touch it."

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What's Your Favorite Slang Word?

From "swag" to "on fleek," tweens choose.

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Cryotherapy's Dubious Appeal

James Hamblin tries a questionable medical treatment.

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Confessions of Moms Around the World

In Europe, mothers get maternity leave, discounted daycare, and flexible working hours.

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How Do Trees Know When It's Spring?

The science behind beautiful seasonal blooming

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