National Magazine Awards: Nominees and Winners

This year, The Atlantic was nominated in three categories for National Magazine Awards for editorial excellence. Read the nominated articles, along with award-winning Atlantic pieces from previous years.

By
2008 Atlantic Nominees

GENERAL EXCELLENCE IN THE 250,000 TO 500,000 CIRCULATION BRACKET
July/August 2008 Atlantic
November 2008 Atlantic
December 2008 Atlantic

FEATURE WRITING
"A Boy's Life" (November 2008)
What would you do if your son wanted to be a girl? Some doctors have a new and troubling answer. By Hanna Rosin

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Tales Out of School" (March 2008)
How a pushy, Type A mother stopped reading Jonathan Kozol and learned to love the public schools. By Sandra Tsing Loh

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"I Choose My Choice!" (July/August 2008)
The fruits of the feminist revolution? Sisterhood, empowerment, and eight hours a day in a cubicle. By Sandra Tsing Loh

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Should Women Rule?" (November 2008)
A clutch of books suggests they can’t rule like men. But there are other ways to run the world. By Sandra Tsing Loh

Winners: 2008

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"The Sanguine Sex" (March 2007)
bortion and the bloodiness of being female. By Caitlin Flanagan

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Babes in the Woods" (July/August 2007)
Anybody could be tracking your children online. Even me. By Caitlin Flanagan

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"No Girlfriend of Mine" (November 2007)
One woman’s estrangement from Hillary Rodham Clinton. By Caitlin Flanagan

Finalists: 2008

PROFILE WRITING
"Present at the Creation" (September 2007)
The only person the speechwriter Michael Gerson made look better than President Bush was Michael Gerson. The shaping of a Washington reputation, as witnessed by a White House colleague. By Michael Gerson

ESSAYS
"Autumn of the Multitaskers" (November 2007)
Neuroscience is confirming what we all suspect: Multitasking is dumbing us down and driving us crazy. One man’s odyssey through the nightmare of infinite connectivity. By Walter Kirn

Finalists: 2007

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
January/February 2006 Atlantic Monthly
September 2006Atlantic Monthly
December 2006Atlantic Monthly

PUBLIC INTEREST
"Declaring Victory" (September 2006)
The United States is succeeding in its struggle against terrorism. The time has come to declare the war on terror over, so that an even more effective military and diplomatic campaign can begin. By James Fallows

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Rhymes With Rich" (May 2006)
One woman’s conscientious objection to the “mommy wars.” By Sandra Tsing Loh

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Cheap Thrills" (July/August 2006)
A story of American women in financial jeopardy. By Sandra Tsing Loh

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"The Drama of the Gifted Parent" (October 2006)
Hey! Leave those kids alone! By Sandra Tsing Loh

Finalists: 2006

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
January/February, 2005 Atlantic Monthly
November, 2005 Atlantic Monthly
December, 2005 Atlantic Monthly

REPORTING
"The Wrath of Khan" (November 2005)
How A. Q. Khan made Pakistan a nuclear power—and showed that the spread of atomic weapons can't be stopped. By William Langewiesche

REPORTING
"In a Ruined Country" (September 2005)
How Yasir Arafat destroyed Palestine. By David Samuels

FICTION
"One of Our Whales Is Missing" (September 2005)
In which Rick Renard, PR hustler par excellence, sets out to save Grimland's gentle giants of the deep. By Christopher Buckley

FICTION
"Bullheads" (April 2005)
He wanted to thank God for his life, and he did. He didn't know what was next, but saw no point in being fearful now. By Michael Lohre

FICTION
"A Record Book for Small Farmers" (January/February 2005)
Had her father been a coward all these years, his reticence a cover for things he was afraid to say? By Anna North

PUBLIC INTEREST
"Why Iraq Has No Army" (December 2005)
An orderly exit from Iraq depends on the development of a viable Iraqi security force, but the Iraqis aren't even close. The Bush administration doesn't take the problem seriously—and it never has. By James Fallows

PROFILES
"Host" (April 2005)
"The key to the John Ziegler Show," says the angry, outraged, and apocalyptically gleeful talk-radio host John Ziegler, "is that I am almost completely real." A report from deep inside the mercenary world of take-no-prisoners political talk radio. By David Foster Wallace

FEATURE WRITING
"Countdown to a Meltdown" (July/August 2005)
America's coming economic crisis. A look back from the election of 2016. By James Fallows

CRITICISM
"Marshal Plan" (March 2005)
The age of parents as friends is over. By Sandra Tsing Loh

CRITICISM
"Kiddie Class Struggle" (June 2005)
One mom's breast-milk-curdling tour of lower education's higher end. By Sandra Tsing Loh

CRITICISM
"The Great Escape" (September 2005)
A grudging salute to an absentee mom. By Sandra Tsing Loh

Winners: 2005

FICTION
"An Incomplete Map of the Northern Polarity" (January/February 2004)
If you were to ask George why he loves Margaret, he would say, "Because she's so mean to me." By Nathan Roberts

FICTION
"Foaling Season" (May 2004)
We could dress Sheila Altman in my sister's clothes and sell her my sister's horse, but what could she understand about the way things worked? By Aryn Kyle

FICTION
"The One in White" (July/August 2004)
"Captain," I say, "you've got about two hundred Mexican soldiers waiting for you in the plaza." By Robert Olen Butler

Finalists: 2005

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
January/February 2004 Atlantic Monthly
July/August 2004 Atlantic Monthly
November 2004 Atlantic Monthly

GENERAL EXCELLENCE IN NEW MEDIA
The Atlantic Online

ESSAYS
"How Serfdom Saved the Women's Movement" (March 2004)
Dispatches from the Nanny wars. By Caitlin Flanagan

FEATURES
"A Sea Story" (May 2004)
On a stormy night on the Baltic Sea, more than 850 people lost their lives when a luxurious ferry sank below the waves. Our correspondent has distilled an account of the Estonia's last moments. By William Langewiesche

Finalists: 2004

BEST INTERACTIVE DESIGN
The Atlantic Online

FICTION
"Happy Hour" (January/February 2003)
"It is nearly five o'clock on a February evening, and the world outside my father's windows is going dark. Evening is my second favorite time of day in the Home..." By Alison Baker

FICTION
"We Have a Pope" (April 2003)
"'I want to show you something.' Baroom pressed a hidden switch and a panel slid back, revealing a stone staircase going down. I thought, uh-oh. I followed him, my hand inside my pocket..." By Christopher Buckley

FICTION
"Yao's Chick" (November 2003)
"The acrobat performed twice more, the second time doing an incredible backward somersault on his way to the basket. She'd had no idea that these things happened at basketball games..." By Max Apple

FICTION
"What Is Visible" (March 2003)
"Everyone says that Doctor is the handsomest man in Boston—who would not want him as an ornament?" By Kimberly Elkins

FICTION
"Monstress" (June 2004)
"We left very early Monday morning, and our flight to California felt like backward travel through time. In Manila it was dark, but outside the plane the sky was bright..." By Lysley Tenorio

FICTION
"Ghost Birds" (October 2003)
"On the bank of the river I noticed a squirrel staring at me. It cocked its head, as if asking what I thought I was doing, and spiraled up a tree, where I lost it in the branches. I remember a sense of calm, stillness, and thinking, This is my death. Interesting." By Nicolas Pizzolatto

PROFILES
"Wynton's Blues" (March 2003)
For two decades Wynton Marsalis ruled the jazz universe. But after a series of sour notes, perhaps the biggest name in jazz faces an uncertain future. Just like jazz itself. By David Hajdu

REPORTING
"The Dark Art of Interrogation" (October 2003)
The most effective way to gather intelligence and thwart terrorism can also be a direct route into morally repugnant terrain. A survey of the landscape of persuasion. By Mark Bowden

PUBLIC INTEREST
"Columbia's Last Flight" (November 2003)
The inside story of the investigation—and the catastrophe it laid bare. By William Langewiesche

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"The Wifely Duty" (January/February 2003)
Marriage used to provide access to sex. Now it provides access to celibacy. By Caitlin Flanagan

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Housewife Confidential" (September 2003)
A tribute to the old-fashioned housewife, and to Erma Bombeck, her champion and guide. By Caitlin Flanagan

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Let's Call the Whole Thing Off" (November 2003)
Is it time to cancel the wedding? By Caitlin Flanagan

Winners: 2003

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
July/August, 2002 Atlantic Monthly
October, 2002 Atlantic Monthly
December, 2002 Atlantic Monthly

PUBLIC INTEREST
"The Fifty-First State?" (November 2002)
Going to war with Iraq would mean shouldering all the responsibilities of an occupying power the moment victory was achieved. These would include running the economy, keeping domestic peace, and protecting Iraq's borders—and doing it all for years, or perhaps decades. Are we ready for this long-term relationship? By James Fallows

Finalists: 2002

ESSAYS
"The Next Christianity" (October 2002)
We stand at a historical turning point, the author argues—one that is as epochal for the Christian world as the original Reformation. By Philip Jenkins

PROFILES
"Tales of the Tyrant" (November 2002)
What does Saddam Hussein see in himself that no one else in the world seems to see? The answer is perhaps best revealed by the intimate details of the Iraqi leader's daily life. By Mark Bowden

REPORTING
"American Ground" (July/August-October 2002)
An exclusive three-part report on the unbuilding of the World Trade Center. By William Langewiesche

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"The Medals of His Defeats" (April 2002)
Our author takes the Great Man down a peg or two—and still finds that Churchill was a great man. By Christopher Hitchens

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"The Man of Feeling" (May 2002)
Lucky Jim, Kingsley Amis's comic masterpiece, may be the funniest book of the past half century. By Christopher Hitchens

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Lightness at Midnight" (September 2002)
Stalinism without irony. By Christopher Hitchens

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Leaving It to the Professionals" (March 2002)
Clearing away clutter is no substitute for keeping house. By Caitlin Flanagan

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"What Price Valor?" (June 2002)
Bravura displays of reproductive technology may shortchange the children. By Caitlin Flanagan

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Home Alone" (September 2002)
It's all too easy to deride Martha Stewart, but the attacks on her often point up how much there is to admire. By Caitlin Flanagann

Winners: 2002

REPORTING
"The Crash of EgyptAir 990" (November 2001)
Two years afterward the U.S. and Egyptian governments are still quarreling over the cause—a clash that grows out of cultural division, not factual uncertainty. A look at the flight data from a pilot's perspective, with the help of simulations of the accident, points to what the Egyptians must already know: the crash was caused not by any mechanical failure but by a pilot's intentional act. By William Langewiesche

PUBLIC INTEREST
"Bystanders to Genocide" (September 2001)
The author's exclusive interviews with scores of the participants in the decision-making, together with her analysis of newly declassified documents, yield a chilling narrative of self-serving caution and flaccid will—and countless missed opportunities to mitigate a colossal crime. By Samantha Power

FEATURE WRITING
"Moonrise" (December 2001)
A mother writes about her teenage son, afflicted with muscular dystrophy, and the life he leads, and the one he can look forward to. By Penny Wolfson

Finalists: 2002

FICTION
"The Hunter's Wife" (May 2001)
"From the hole the smell of bear came to her, like wet dog, like wild mushrooms. The hunter removed some leaves. Beneath was a shaggy flank, a patch of brown fur." By Anthony Doerr

FICTION
"Digging" (September 2001)
"Father Moran himself hardly has any idea of how lovely she looks to him, at this dusky moment in the kitchen when her aunt Margaret isn't there and he's barely awake and can't tell exactly who he is, priest or man, but he manages to say, 'Here, now, what's this all about?'" By Beth Lorden

FICTION
"Popular Girls" (October 2001)
"You know who we are. We're Kaethe and Alina, CJ and Sydney. Stephanie. Our hair is blonde or brown or black. Rarely red, rarely curly. It's thick and straight, and falls back into place after we run our fingers through it and hold it away from our faces long enough for you to see our striking eyes. When we do this, you get shivers." By Karen Shepard

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"The Wedding Merchants" (February 2001)
Marriage is in Chapter Eleven, but the white wedding is in the black. By Caitlin Flanagan

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"The Tabloid Habit" (July/August 2001)
Relentless celebrity coverage is a phenomenon as old as the movies. By Caitlin Flanagan

REVIEWS AND CRITICISM
"Confessions of a Prep School College Counselor" (September 2001)
Our author looks at books about college admissions—and at the unexamined prejudices fueling the "elite" college admissions frenzy. By Caitlin Flanagan

Finalists: 2001

PUBLIC INTEREST
"Health Care: A Bolt of Civic Hope" (October 2000)
In an anti-political time the politics of remedy is still possible. Two congressmen, one liberal, one conservative, both versed in the relevant complexities, agree on the bones of a plan to insure the 44 million Americans without health insurance. By Matthew Miller

PROFILES
"The Million-Dollar Nose" (December 2000)
With his stubborn disregard for the hierarchy of wines, Robert Parker, the straight-talking American wine critic, is revolutionizing the industry—and teaching the French wine establishment some lessons it would rather not learn. By William Langewiesche

FICTION
"Tyrants" (January 2000)
"She would not meet Stalin's eyes, but she thought he might be smiling. He shifted in his bed to make room and patted a spot on the covers by his leg. He said, 'Can you sit with me?'" By Marshall N. Klimasewiski

FICTION
"I Am the Grass" (September 2000)
At the end of his first week his feelings of guilt and ambivalence were being replaced by a sense of good will and atonement, as if he and Vietnam were two bad people who had unexpectedly done something nice for each other. By Daly Walker

Finalists: 2000

GENERAL EXCELLENCE IN NEW MEDIA
The Atlantic Online

PROFILES
"Eden: A Gated Community" (June 1999)
After making a fortune as founder of North Face and Esprit, Douglas Tompkins bought a Yosemite-sized piece of wilderness in Chile, where only he and a like-minded few would live. Tompkins ran into one big problem: other people. By William Langewiesche

Winner: 1999

ESSAYS & CRITICISM
"Hymn" (July 1998)
Nearly a century has passed since W.E.B. Du Bois identified "the problem of the twentieth century," but as the millennium arrives, the legacy of the color line is palpable in American life. One of the times that line is still deeply inscribed and observed is Sunday morning. By Emily Hiestand

Finalists: 1999

REPORTING
"Who Will Own Your Next Good Idea?" (September 1998)
Some corporations want to lock up copyright even tighter. Some naive intellectuals want to abandon copyright altogether. Where is a "do-nothing" Congress now that we need one? By Charles C. Mann

REPORTING
"The Lessons of ValuJet 592" (March 1998)
As a reconstruction of this terrible crash suggests, in complex systems some accidents may be "normal" -- and trying to prevent them all could even make operations more dangerous. By William Langewiesche

Winner: 1998

PUBLIC INTEREST
"The Computer Delusion" (July 1998)
There is no good evidence that most uses of computers significantly improve teaching and learning, yet school districts are cutting programs—music, art, physical education—that enrich children's lives to make room for this dubious nostrum, and the Clinton Administration has embraced the goal of "computers in every classroom" with credulous and costly enthusiasm. By Todd Oppenheimer

Finalists: 1998

GENERAL EXCELLENCE IN NEW MEDIA
The Atlantic Online

FICTION
"There Was a Time" (February 1997)
"'Bulls are unpredictable,' my father said. 'They can be as nice as can be one day, and for no reason take you out the next. They can go crazy in the spring.'" By Christina Adam

FICTION
"Satan: Hijacker of the Planet" (August 1997)
The stars are the eyes of God, and they have been watching us from the beginning of the world. Do you think there isn't an eye for each of us? Go on and count. By Louise Erdrich

FICTION
"The Banks of the Vistula" (September 1997)
How could she win an argument against somebody with an early training in propaganda? She had to resort finally to the truth, that rinky-dink little boat in the great sea of persuasion. By Rebecca Lee

Finalists: 1997

GENERAL EXCELLENCE IN NEW MEDIA
The Atlantic Online

FICTION
"Cosmopolitan" (January 1996)
The magazine article mentioned that when leaving after making love for the first time, one should always arrange the next meeting. Gopal phoned Mrs. Shaw. By Akhil Sharma

FICTION
"Horse Heaven Hills" (November 1996)
What made her go on? Another woman would stay in the house, would chop wood and wait, would make do until the storm had passed. By Christina Adam

FICTION
"The Greatest Show on Earth" (December 1996)
When the father made his weekly trip to Pofadderkranz, he had sometimes taken the twins along for the drive. Now Mrs. Prinsloo went with him instead. By Sheila Gordon

Finalist: 1996

REPORTING
"In the Strawberry Fields" (November 1995)
The management of California's strawberry industry offers a case study of both the dependence on an imported peasantry that characterizes much of American agriculture and the destructive consequences of a deliberate low-wage economy. By Eric Schlosser

Winners: 1995

REPORTING
"Reefer Madness" (August 1994)
Marijuana has not been de facto legalized, and the war on drugs is not just about cocaine and heroin. In fact, today, when we don't have enough jail cells for murderers, rapists, and other violent criminals, there may be more people in federal and state prisons for marijuana offenses than at any other time in U.S. history. By Eric Schlosser

REPORTING
"Marijuana and the Law" (September 1994)
The vigorous enforcement of marijuana laws has resulted in four million arrests since the early 1980s. Owing to mandatory-minimum sentences, many of those convicted are receiving stiff prison terms, even as violent criminals are released for lack of space. By Eric Schlosser

Finalists: 1995

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
September 1994 Atlantic Monthly
October 1994 Atlantic Monthly
November 1994 Atlantic Monthly

FICTION
"The Drowning" (March 1994)
By Edward J. Delaney

FICTION
"The Artist" (October 1994)
By Edward Falco

FICTION
"A Country Killing" (November 1994)
By E. Annie Proulx

Finalists: 1993

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
January 1993 Atlantic Monthly
June 1993 Atlantic Monthly
November 1993Atlantic Monthly

REPORTING
"The Story of a Gun" (January 1993)
After 60,000 deaths from firearms use over the past two years, America is in a gun crisis. Yet gun laws remain weak, gunmakers continue to promote killing power, and gun dealers accept no responsibility for the criminal use of what they sell. By Erik Larson

PUBLIC INTEREST
"Dan Quayle Was Right" (April 1993)
The social-science evidence is in: though it may benefit the adults involved, the dissolution of intact two-parent families is harmful to large numbers of children. Moreover, the author argues, family diversity in the form of increasing numbers of single-parent and stepparent families does not strengthen the social fabric but, rather, dramatically weakens and undermines society. By Barbara Dafoe Whitehead

Winner: 1993

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
October 1992 Atlantic Monthly
November 1992 Atlantic Monthly
December 1992Atlantic Monthly

Finalist: 1993

PERSONAL SERVICE
"Problem Adoptions" (September 1992)
By Katharine Davis Fishman

Finalists: 1992

FEATURE WRITING
"The World In Its Extreme" (November 1991)
It is the hottest place in the world, and the driest. It is home to thriving commerce and to desperate, hopeless poverty. It is the Sahara, an eternal source of fascination and terro. By William Langewiesche

FICTION
"The Time for Kissing" (February 1991)
By Roxana Robinson

FICTION
"Sole Custody" (September 1991)
By Lynna Williams

FICTION
"Departures" (December 1991)
By Jill McCorkle

Finalists: 1991

FEATURE WRITING
"The Hands That Would Shape Our Souls" (December 1990)
How will the next generation of American clergy fare? Are they what we need or want? By Paul Wilkes

FEATURE WRITING
"The Man With All the Answers" (January 1990)
By Charles C. Mann

SPECIAL INTERESTS
"Before the First Sip" (May 1990)
By Corby Kummer

SPECIAL INTERESTS
"Untroubled Brewing?" (June 1990)
By Corby Kummer

SPECIAL INTERESTS
"Is Coffee Harmful?" (July 1990)
By Corby Kummer

FICTION
"Black and Tan" (February 1990)
By Madison Smartt Bell

FICTION
"Earthly Justice" (October 1990)
By E.S. Goldman

FICTION
"Sanity" (December 1990)
By Tobias Wolff

Finalists: 1990

FEATURE WRITING
"Rubbish!" (December 1989)
By William J. Rathje

FICTION
"A Van for Violet" (January 1989)
By Ernst Havemann

FICTION
"Stone Cowboy on the High Plains" (June 1989)
By Mark Jacobs

FICTION
"Stand" (July 1989)
By David Michael Kaplan

Winners: 1988

PUBLIC INTEREST
"The Morning After" (October 1987)
America has let its infrastructure crumble, its foreign markets decline, its productivity dwindle, its savings evaporate, and its budget and borrowing burgeon. And now the day of reckoning is at hand. By Peter G. Peterson

FICTION
"A Farm at Raraba" (January 1987)
By Ernst Havemann

FICTION
"The Man Who Knew Belle Starr" (April 1987)
By Richard Bausch

FICTION
"The Halfway Diner" (June 1987)
By John Sayles

FEATURE WRITING
"The Man Who Loves Only Numbers" (November 1987)
By Paul Hoffman

Finalists: 1988

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
August 1987 Atlantic Monthly
October 1987 Atlantic Monthly
November 1987Atlantic Monthly

PUBLIC INTEREST
"Heterosexuals and AIDS" (February 1987)
By Katie Leishman

NEWS REPORTING
"A Damaged Culture" (November 1987)
By James Fallows

Finalists: 1987

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
April 1986 Atlantic Monthly
August 1986 Atlantic Monthly
December 1986Atlantic Monthly

ESSAYS & CRITICISM
"Why Do Men Say That I Am" (December 1986)
By Cullen Murphy

PUBLIC INTEREST
The Origins of the Underclass, Part I & Part II" (June and July 1986)
By Nicholas Lemann

SPECIAL INTERESTS
"Four Ways to Walk a Dog" (April 1986)
By Michael Lenehan

Finalists: 1986

GENERAL EXCELLENCE
March 1985 Atlantic Monthly
July 1985 Atlantic Monthly
November 1985Atlantic Monthly

PERSONAL SERVICE
"A Crisis in Public Health" (October 1985)
By Katie Leishman

FICTION
"Vulcan" (June 1985)
By Peter Behrens

FICTION
"What Feels Like the World" (October 1985)
By Richard Bausch

FICTION
"Doe Season" (November 1985)
By David Michael Kaplan

Finalists: 1985

REPORTING
"What's Wrong With Congress?" (December 1984)
By Gregg Easterbrook

FICTION
"Saint Marie" (March 1984)
By Louise Erdrich

FICTION
"The Poor Are Always With Us" (September 1984)
By Tobias Wolff

FICTION
"The Small Things That Save Us" (October 1984)
By Brent Spencer

Finalists: 1983

FICTION
"Playing Trombone" (March 1982)
By Nicholson Baker

FICTION
"Feathers" (September 1982)
By Raymond Carver

FICTION
"Visitors" (April 1982)
By Alice Munro

Winners: 1982

PUBLIC SERVICE
"The Education of David Stockman" (December 1981)
In 1980, David Stockman was selected to be the budget director for the incoming Reagan Administration. Soon afterwards, William Greider approached Stockman and asked if he could write about his experiences in the budget office. Stockman agreed. When the article appeared in The Atlantic, it created a firestorm of controversy. Stockman, who had spoken too freely of his reservations about the Administration's policies, lost his job. By William Greider

ESSAYS & CRITICISM
"Designer Dancing" (April 1981)
By Holly Bruback

ESSAYS & CRITICISM
"Balanchine's Tchaikovsky" (June 1981)
By Holly Bruback

ESSAYS & CRITICISM
"Moving Pictures" (September 1981).
By Holly Bruback

Finalists: 1982

FICTION
"Detroit Skyline" (June 1981).
By Bobbie Ann Mason

FICTION
"Cathedral" (September 1981).
By Raymond Carver

FICTION
"The Prophet's Hair" (September 1981).
Salman Rushdie

Finalists: 1981

ESSAYS & CRITICISM
"A State of Grace"
By Don Ethan Miller

ESSAYS & CRITICISM
"The Rage to Know".
By Horace Freeland Judson

Finalists: 1980

SERVICE TO THE INDIVIDUAL
"On the Death of a Baby"
By Robert and Peggy Stinton

FICTION
"The Man Who Loved Levittown"
By W.D. Witherall

Winner: 1979

FICTION
"Oh, Joseph, I'm So Tired"
By Richard Yates

Finalist: 1976

FICTION AND BELLES LETTRES
"I-80 Nebraska"
By John Sayles

Finalists: 1975

REPORTING EXCELLENCE
"The Making of the Sub-Saharan Wasteland"
By Claire Sterling

FICTION AND BELLES LETTRES
"Verily I Say Unto You" (July 1974)
By Alice Adams

PUBLIC SERVICE
"The Judge Who Tried Harder" (April 1974)
By George Higgins

PUBLIC SERVICE
"The Friends of Richard Nixon" (November 1974)
By George Higgins

Finalists: 1974

REPORTING EXCELLENCE
"Do Schools Make a Difference?" (March 1973)
By Godfrey Hodgson

FICTION
"Guide to the Architecture of D.C." (February 1973)
By Ward Just

FICTION
"Nora" (May 1973)

PUBLIC SERVICE
"Journal of a Plague Year" (August 1973)

Winner: 1973

FICTION
"Enormous Changes at the Last Minute" (1972)
By Grace Paley

Winner: 1972

REPORTING EXCELLENCE
"The 800,000,000: Report from China" (1971)
By Ross Terrill

Winner: 1971

REPORTING EXCELLENCE
"Soldiers" (October and November 1970)
By Ward Just

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