The House Belongs to Its Dweller

A portrait of Libya

By Veronika Lukasova

Abdu al Salam and his gazelle take a break from photographing couples for a fee in As-Saha al-Kradrah (Green Square), in the heart of Tripoli.

Dresses for sale hang on dummies in the medina, Tripoli's old walled city.

An immigrant from Central Africa has a smoke outside his clothing store.

A youth wheels goods home from Souk al-Joma, the Friday market, where one can find anything from used plumbing to framed Koran verses.

A young man carries the Libyan flag through Green Square.

Wisdom from Muammar al-Qaddafi's Green Book, which lays out his crude political and economic vision, decorates the walls of a building near Green Square.

A new bride poses for photographs during an all-female post-ceremony reception.

Children play in the streets of the medina.

A Libyan youth group gathers for a ceremony in a public park to commemorate the anniversary of the People's Congress, which was created thirty years ago by Qaddafi and is still controlled by him.

A young Libyan woman chats on the phone while browsing through a perfume store in Gargaresh, an upscale section of Tripoli.

A man walks at sunset on a beach in Tripoli.

This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2006/10/the-house-belongs-to-its-dweller/305229/