Rote From Underground

Progressive books that—like Michael Moore—(ought to) make progressives wince

By Marc Cooper

The Exception to the Rulers: Exposing Oily Politicians, War Profiteers, and the Media That Love Them, by Amy Goodman, with David Goodman (2004). Pacifica Radio's high priestess of political correctness (and her brother) cash in on her cult status with a cut-and-paste jeremiad. The enemy? Corporate media. Published by those revolutionaries at Disney.

We Want Freedom: A Life in the Black Panther Party, by Mumia Abu-Jamal (2004). Another death-row apologia from the convicted cop killer and self-proclaimed political prisoner, philosopher, and poet. If Mumia cut his dreadlocks and changed his name back to Wesley Cook, would they still swoon over him at Bennington and Bard?

The Republican Noise Machine: Right-Wing Media and How It Corrupts Democracy, by David Brock (2004). As a pay-to-play conservative attack dog, Brock pretended to be a journalist. Now, as a subsidized liberal, he pretends to be a pundit.

Bushwomen: Tales of a Cynical Species, by Laura Flanders (2004). Revealed: Republican heroines, from Condi Rice to Laura Bush, are not really feminists! Shocking, just shocking.

Bonus title:

My Life, by Bill Clinton (2004). One crucial apology omitted from the Great Triangulator's 900-page oil slick: "If I had resigned when I got caught with my pants down, George W. Bush would never have been President."

This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2004/10/rote-from-underground/303485/