Chartist September 2013

The Real Cost of Segregation—in 1 Big Chart

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America is more diverse than it’s ever been. With whites projected to be a minority by 2043, the traditional racial geography of the American city—blacks and Hispanics in the inner city, whites in the suburbs—is eroding. Ever since the Fair Housing Act took effect in 1968, nationwide residential segregation between blacks and whites has been on the decline. But a closer look at who lives where shows that this story may be more complicated than it appears— and that a particular swath of urban Americans are actually more segregated than ever.

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Emily Badger is a former staff writer at CityLab. Her work has previously appeared in Pacific StandardGOODThe Christian Science Monitor, and The New York Times. She lives in the Washington, D.C. area.

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