Here Comes Kennedy

A photo essay
Family patriarch and merciless businessman Joseph P. Kennedy served as the U.S. ambassador to Britain in 1938. Here, he's flanked by his eldest son, Joe Jr. (left) and his next-oldest son, John. (Associated Press)

After graduating from Harvard College in June 1940, the 23-year-old JFK entered Stanford University as a graduated student the following fall. (Associated Press)

Rose Kennedy with her children around 1923. From left: Rose, Eunice, Kathleen, Rosemary (seated on the ground), John, and Joe Jr. (Barach Studios/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum)

At the Choate School in Wallingford, Connecticut, the teenage JFK (second from right) played on the junior football team.. (Associated Press)

JFK as a lieutenant, junior grade, in the Navy in 1942. (Frank Turgeon Jr./JFK Presidential Library and Museum)

The "well oriented, normal" Harvard freshman has already settled on a career. (John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum)

The skipper of PT-109 in 1943. (John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum)
War hero John F. Kennedy campaigns for Congress in 1946 in a Massachusetts district. JFK never lost an election. (Associated Press)

Kennedy campaigns in Nashua, New Hampshire, on the Massachusetts border, in January 1960. His only opponent in the state's March 8 presidential primary was the inventor of a space-age ballpoint pen. (John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum)


Running to succeed the then-oldest president in U.S. history, JFK used paraphernalia that stressed his youthful appearance and the advent of a new decade. (John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum)
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