Ban Gasoline

In a world with a single, fungible energy market, talk of U.S. energy independence (whatever that means) is a fantasy, and grousing about imported oil is little better. But there is a non-fantastic way to reduce energy vulnerability: a multinational ban on gasoline.

Specifically, America should propose an international treaty whose signatories would agree to eliminate gasoline from their transportation systems by a date certain—say, in 2050.

Why focus on gas in particular? Because gasoline is where the world’s petrogarchs have us by the short hairs. The electrical grid and many industrial users can juggle fuel sources; when oil prices rise, they can typically switch to methane or coal. But the transportation sector is 94 percent dependent on oil. The “oil weapon,” for that reason, is really mainly a gasoline weapon.

Replacing gas would take a few decades, but it is doable. If outright elimination seems a stretch, remember: stepwise reductions would also help. Indeed, for the United States simply to make the offer of a gasoline treaty would, at a stroke, focus the energy-security debate where it belongs.

Next idea: Actually, Fossil Fuels Are Here to Stay

Presented by

Jonathan Rauch is an Atlantic contributing editor and guest scholar at the Brookings Institution.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.
More back issues, Sept 1995 to present.

Just In