Dispatch December 2009

The Most-Read Articles of 2009

3.    “How American Healthcare Killed My Father,” by David Goldhill (September 2009)
Ever since 2007, when his father died of a hospital-borne infection, David Goldhill has had a lot of questions. How did medical technology fall so far behind the times? What is the point of constantly reshuffling nurse’s shifts? Why don’t more doctors simply wash their hands? The root of all these problems, he argues in this Atlantic cover story, is a skewed incentive system. His essay is a plea to Congress to step back from the minutiae of the health care debate and figure out how to make doctors accountable not to agencies but to human beings.

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Never Tell People How Old They Look

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