Cheese Whizzes

Formaggio Kitchen, Cambridge, Massachusetts (www.formaggio-kitchen.com, 888-212-3224), is as notable for its Italian and French candies and oils as for its cheese.

Artisanal (www.artisanalcheese.com, 877-797-1200) brought affinage on a large scale to New York City after Terrance Brennan and Max McCalman made the cheese course at Picholine (where Brennan was—and remains—chef and owner and McCalman was maître d’) a city legend. Now they age and sell cheese for restaurants and mail-order customers all over the country.

Also see:

The Art of Aging Well
A cult destination in London has revolutionized cheesemaking, winning converts as far afield as Vermont.

Zingerman’s, Ann Arbor, Michigan (www.zingermans.com, 888-636-8162), is the national leader in educating apprentice cheese-lovers. Its co-owner, Ari Weinzweig, long ago formed a partnership with Neal’s Yard Dairy, in England, and still gets the best selection of the cheeses it ages (and often transforms through aging).

The Cheese Store of Beverly Hills (www.cheesestorebh.com, 800-547-1515) has become a Los Angeles favorite. It is prized for its discoveries of farmhouse cheeses in both Europe and America, and the care it takes in presenting and selling them.

The Cheese Board Collective (cheeseboardcollective.coop, 510-549-3183) is a Berkeley institution that predates even Chez Panisse, which is directly across the street. Its members are owners and are unusually generous in their enthusiasm for the cheeses they all help to select and age.

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Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." More

Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. The San Francisco Examiner pronounced him "a dean among food writers in America." Julia Child once said, "I think he's a very good food writer. He really does his homework. As a reporter and a writer he takes his work very seriously." Kummer's 1990 Atlantic series about coffee was heralded by foodies and the general public alike. The response to his recommendations about coffees and coffee-makers was typical--suppliers scrambled to meet the demand. As Giorgio Deluca, co-founder of New York's epicurean grocery Dean & Deluca, says: "I can tell when Corby's pieces hit; the phone doesn't stop ringing." His book, The Joy of Coffee, based on his Atlantic series, was heralded by The New York Times as "the most definitive and engagingly written book on the subject to date." In nominating his work for a National Magazine Award (for which he became a finalist), the editors wrote: "Kummer treats food as if its preparation were something of a life sport: an activity to be pursued regularly and healthfully by knowledgeable people who demand quality." Kummer's book The Pleasures of Slow Food celebrates local artisans who raise and prepare the foods of their regions with the love and expertise that come only with generations of practice. Kummer was restaurant critic of New York Magazine in 1995 and 1996 and since 1997 has served as restaurant critic for Boston Magazine. He is also a frequent food commentator on television and radio. He was educated at Yale, immediately after which he came to The Atlantic. He is the recipient of five James Beard Journalism Awards, including the MFK Fisher Distinguished Writing Award.

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