Cover to Cover

A guide to additional releases

RELIGION

Body Piercing Saved My Life
by Andrew Beaujon (Da Capo)
A music journalist explores the thriving (and increasingly hip) Christian-rock scene.

Rumspringa
by Tom Shachtman (North Point)
Tradition dictates that Amish teens take time away from their community to sow their wild oats. Sex, drugs, and rock-and-roll ensue—followed, in 80 percent of the cases, by a return to the fold.

ESSAYS

Friendship
by Joseph Epstein (Houghton Mifflin)
A leading essayist’s musings on the changing nature of companionship and fraternity.

I Feel Bad About My Neck
by Nora Ephron (Knopf)
Thoughts on aging and femininity from a veteran cultural observer.

Uncommon Carriers
by John McPhee (FSG)
A freight-transport travelogue conducted via towboat, UPS, and tanker truck.

MEMOIR

Heat
by Bill Buford (Knopf)
A New Yorker writer agrees to become Mario Batali’s “kitchen slave,” learning valuable lessons about excess and suffering in the process.

Into My Own
by Roger Kahn (St. Martin’s)
The eminent sportswriter pays tribute to the people who most shaped his life, including his parents, Robert Frost, and Pee Wee Reese.

The Sound of No Hands Clapping
by Toby Young (Da Capo)
The bumbling Hollywood adventures of the author of How to Lose Friends and Alienate People.

Presented by

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

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Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

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