Best Sellers Abroad January/February 2006

Turkey

Top ten best sellers in Turkey, as of November 2005, according to the Publishers' Association of Turkey

1. Those Crazy Turks, by Turgut Özakman. A Micheneresque opus recounting the battle for the creation of the modern Turkish republic.

2. The Zahir, by Paulo Coelho. The popular Brazilian writer's multicontinental odyssey of loss, love, and the search for self.

3. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, by J. K. Rowling. The penultimate volume of … oh, you know.

4. The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari, by Robin Sharma. Wall Street meets On the Road, generously larded with New Age flapdoodle.

5. The Longest Night, by Ahmet Altan. A tale of ill-starred romance in the grandest tradition of Turkish tear-jerkers.

6. Amat, by Ihsan Oktay Anar. A swashbuckling epic transports readers back to a Turkish galleon, the Golden Horn, and the glory days of the Ottoman Empire.

7. Where're You Headed, Sister? by Gülse Birsel. A popular Turkish political humorist skewers Dubya.

8. Metal Storm 2—Salvation, by Burak Turna. Continues the saga begun in a previous best seller, Metal Storm, of Turkey in a future battle with U.S. invaders.

9. Living to Tell the Tale, by Gabriel Garcia Márquez. A memoir: the early years of Colombia's most renowned modern novelist.

10. Metal Storm 2—The Lost Coffin, by Orkun Uçar. Drawing Israel into the fray, one of Metal Storm's co-authors pens his own sequel, which covers a U.S. bombardment of Atatürk's mausoleum, in Ankara, and the mystery of the Father of the Turks' vanished coffin.

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Jeffrey Tayler is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and the author of seven books.

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