Best Sellers Abroad November 2005

Russia

A top-ten book list, as of August 2005, based on sales data compiled by Moscow's Dom Knigi (House of Books).

1. I Take My Words Back, by Viktor Suvorov. A Russian military historian finds flaws in the memoirs of the late Soviet World War II hero Marshal Zhukov—and takes his words back for him.

2. Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, by John Perkins. World economic institutions are purportedly shown to be as corrupt and conspiracy-ridden as Russians always believed them to be.

3. The Blue Day Book, by Bradley Trevor Greive. Animal photos and corny captions as mood enhancers, compiled by a Tasmanian author.

4. My Life, by Bill Clinton. The memoirs of Russia's favorite American president.

5. Catherine the Great: The Diamond Cinderella, by Aleksandr Bushkov. A patriotic account of a German noblewoman's rise to the Russian throne and of her rule as an enlightened despot.

6. Hunting for Werewolves, by Aleksandr Khinshtein. A Duma deputy's exposé of the gravest threat to law and order in Russia: "werewolves" (corrupt law-enforcement officers).

7. Business Is Psychology, by Marina Meliya. Self-help for the disgruntled Russian businessman.

8. Lost Civilization: In Search of Lost Mankind, by Aleksei Maslov. The "true" history of mankind, including Atlantis, our vanished horned ancestors, and mysterious giants.

9. Doctor Sinelnikov's Practical Course: How to Learn to Love Yourself, by V. Sinelnikov and S. Slobodchikov. A step-by-step course in supermarket psychology, Russian-style, for sufferers of low self-esteem.

10. The Mafia Manager: A Guide to the Corporate Machiavelli, by V. An anonymous author confirms what Russian entrepreneurs already know: business isn't about mission statements, but about who whacks whom—commercially, of course.

Presented by

Jeffrey Tayler is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and the author of seven books.

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Entertainment

More back issues, Sept 1995 to present.

Just In