Best Sellers Abroad July/August 2005

Japan

Top ten works of nonfiction, as of April 2005, based on sales data compiled by Nippon Shuppan Hanbai Inc. (Nippan), Japan's largest book and magazine distributor.

1. How Smart and Stupid People Talk, by Yuichi Higuchi. This "essential guide to avoid being called an idiot" cautions that stupidity can be revealed in even the most casual of conversations.

2. Why Bamboo-Pole Sellers Won't Go Bankrupt and Other Accounting Mysteries, by Shinya Yamada. A pop approach to accounting.

3. The Etiquette of Good Humor, by Takashi Saito. If you want to raise your productivity and uncover your hidden talents, get rid of sulky moods.

4. The Idiot Wall, by Takeshi Yoro. Aims to explain and relieve the frustrations felt by adversaries: bosses and subordinates, the young and the elderly, Americans and Islamic fundamentalists. A best seller since 2003.

5. The Art of Healthy Living, by Hiroyuki Itsuki. How one man's unorthodox lifestyle has enabled him to avoid hospitals for fifty years.

6. The Hag-ification of Aging Women: Reclaiming Female Sexuality, by Chizuru Misago. A health expert takes a second look at the older female body.

7. Change Your Fortune Through Zodiac Science, by Kazuko Hosoki. A guide to managing your health, your job, and your finances through astrology and feng shui.

8. A Korean in Japan: Torn Between Two Motherlands, by Kang Sang-jung. Insights into Japanese-Korean relations from a University of Tokyo professor of information studies.

9. Essays in Idleness for Everyday Life, by Takashi Saito. The contemporary relevance of a much revered fourteenth-century classic by Kenko Yoshida.

10. How to Write Prose That Suggests Intelligence, by Juzo Koizumi. A sort of Elements of Style for Japanese communicators.

Presented by

The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

Video

Playing An Actual Keyboard Cat

A music video transforms food, pets, and objects into extraordinary instruments.

Video

Stunning GoPro Footage of a Wildfire

In the field with America’s elite Native American firefighting crew

Video

The Man Who Built a Forest Larger Than Central Park

Since 1979, he has planted more than 1,300 acres of trees.

More in Entertainment

More back issues, Sept 1995 to present.

Just In