After the Wars

Yugoslavia and the World

FOUR years have passed since the Dayton Accords brought a complicated, bitter peace to Bosnia. Almost a year has passed since NATO air strikes drove Serbian forces out of the Yugoslav province of Kosovo, making possible another complicated, bitter peace. Soldiers from the United States, Great Britain, Russia, and many other countries -- all told, some 65,000 strong -- are now stationed as peacekeepers in the Balkans. Besides a considerable reduction in violence -- no small achievement -- what has the world's intervention wrought? Our correspondents, taking stock, address three subjects. Charles Trueheart ["A New Kind of Justice"] looks at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, which is investigating war crimes and putting alleged perpetrators on trial, and at the surprising precedent the tribunal may have set. Chuck Sudetic ["The Reluctant Gendarme"] explains why indicted war criminals can live with impunity in the sector of Bosnia controlled by the French. And David Rieff ["Midnight in Sarajevo"], who lived in and reported from Sarajevo during its years of siege, returns to a city that may represent a portent for Kosovo: physically safe but spiritually and socially ravaged, it owes such life as it has to foreign money and foreign troops.


The Atlantic Monthly; April 2000; After the Wars - 00.04; Volume 285, No. 4; page 79.

Presented by

Saving the Bees

Honeybees contribute more than $15 billion to the U.S. economy. A short documentary considers how desperate beekeepers are trying to keep their hives alive.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.
More back issues, Sept 1995 to present.

Just In