Business

How One Man Turned Himself Into a Publicly Owned Company

Mike Merrill puts the "I" in IPO.

What Exactly Is Donald Trump's Deal?

Is he a buffoon? A genius? An exploration of the man, his brand, and his chronic bluster.

Where the Recession Hit Us Hardest: An Interactive Map

How different regions and industries have weathered the downturn—and the recovery

The Return of the Monopoly: An Infographic

More mergers, fewer players. Is this the end of competitive capitalism?

Anthropology Inc.

Forget online surveys and dinnertime robo-calls. A consulting firm called ReD is at the forefront of a new trend in market research, treating the everyday lives of consumers as a subject worthy of social-science scrutiny. On behalf of its corporate clients, ReD will uncover your deepest needs, fears, and desires.

The Incredible Shrinking Ad

As our attention shifts to mobile phones—and their smaller screens—ads are becoming vastly less effective. And companies built on ad revenues, like Google and Facebook, should start to sweat.

The Myth of the Student-Loan Crisis

The Web’s New Monopolists

Just because Facebook and Google are innovative now doesn’t mean they won’t strangle growth and harm us all—if we let them.

What’s Inside America’s Banks?

Some four years after the 2008 financial crisis, public trust in banks is as low as ever. Sophisticated investors describe big banks as “black boxes” that may still be concealing enormous risks—the sort that could again take down the economy. A close investigation of a supposedly conservative bank’s financial records uncovers the reason for these fears—and points the way toward urgent reforms.

Mr. China Comes to America

For decades, every trend in manufacturing favored the developing world and worked against the United States. But new tools that greatly speed up development from idea to finished product encourage start-up companies to locate here, not in Asia. Could global trade winds finally be blowing toward America again?

The Insourcing Boom

After years of offshore production, General Electric is moving much of its far-flung appliance-manufacturing operations back home. It is not alone. An exploration of the startling, sustainable, just-getting-started return of industry to the United States.

The Next Panic

Europe’s crisis will be followed by a more devastating one, likely beginning in Japan.

The Cheapest Generation

Why Millennials aren’t buying cars or houses, and what that means for the economy

Why Women Still Can’t Have It All

It’s time to stop fooling ourselves, says a woman who left a position of power: the women who have managed to be both mothers and top professionals are superhuman, rich, or self-employed. If we truly believe in equal opportunity for all women, here’s what has to change.

The Triumph of the Family Farm

Farming is in the midst of a startling renaissance—one that holds lessons for America’s economic future.

How We Got the Crash Wrong

Leverage was not the problem—incentives were, and still are.

CSI: Housing Bust

In this business, the best employees are the most paranoid ones.

Why You Can’t Get a Taxi

And how an upstart company may change that

Europe’s Real Crisis

The Continent’s problems are as much demographic as financial. They won’t go away soon.

How We Spend

And what that tells us about the economy

What Isn’t for Sale?

Market thinking so permeates our lives that we barely notice it anymore. A leading philosopher sums up the hidden costs of a price-tag society.

The Villain

The left hates him. The right hates him even more. But Ben Bernanke saved the economy—and has navigated masterfully through the most trying of times.

The Man Who Broke Atlantic City

Don Johnson won nearly $6 million playing blackjack in one night, single-handedly decimating the monthly revenue of Atlantic City’s Tropicana casino. Not long before that, he’d taken the Borgata for $5 million and Caesars for $4 million. Here’s how he did it.

Why Companies Fail

GM’s stock price has sunk by a third since its IPO. Why is corporate turnaround so difficult and rare? The answer is often culture—the hardest thing of all to change.

The Graduates

Busted banking careers, crashed consultants, and shrunken incomes: the author attends her 10-year business-school reunion for lessons on how M.B.A.s can survive a recession.

Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

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