New York Ideas

New York Ideas 2012

April 16 – 17, 2012
New York, NY, New York

Hosted in Partnership With

Aspen Institute

The inaugural New York Ideas, organized by The Atlantic, the Aspen Institute, and the New-York Historical Society, was a day- long event with a constellation of leaders - in the roles of attendees, provocateurs, and speakers. The event took on the largest issues of the day - through interviews, discussions, and debates. It recognized New York’s status as a major actor in all of the significant policy issues facing the country.

New York Ideas Agenda

See the below players for video coverage of the 2012 New York Ideas program:

 

Panel: What Must Be Done To Save The US & Global Economies

 

 

Panel: Health Care Debate, Act Two

 

Panel: Cities 2012

 

Panel: America's Role In The World

Presented by

Atlantic Live

Speakers

Hosted in Partnership With

Underwriters

Presenting Level

Supporting Level

Also in This Series

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    New York Ideas 2014

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  • Economy/Business

    New York Ideas 2013

    The Manhattan incarnation of The Atlantic and the Aspen Institute’s esteemed Ideas franchise will focus on “The Innovators” in 2013, convening leaders in business, finance, technology, the sciences, and the arts.

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