Green Intelligence Forum

October 26 – 27, 2010
Washington, DC

After two successful years of bringing the world’s leading authorities on energy and environmental issues together for a day of intelligent exchange on the changing landscape of energy markets, conservation efforts, and alternatives to fossil fuels, The Atlantic expanded its Green Intelligence Forum to two days in 2010.

The Atlantic's 2010 Green Intelligence Forum dedicated a full day to Green Energy and Sustainability, looking at supply-chain and manufacturing issues as well as the energy market itself. The following morning, the Forum built upon the foundation laid at the The Atlantic's 2009 Water Summit, exploring the nexus of water and energy as well as water quality and development policy.

As always, The Atlantic drew upon a wide range of professions and 360º points of view to facilitate a penetrating, lively, and illuminating two days of conversation.

In case you missed the livestream of the event, video of all the panels and headline interviews are below:

 

DAY 1 VIDEOS

Welcome and Intro

Interview with David Hayes plus 'Powering the Future, Sustainably' panel

 

'The Path to a Low Carbon World' panel plus 'What Green Means to Industry' panel

 

'Environmental Competitiveness' panel plus Keynote by Bill Ritter

 

 

DAY 2 VIDEOS

Welcome Back

Interview with Melody Barnes plus 'The Future of Fresh Water' panel

 

'Moving Towards Clean Transportation' panel plus Keynote by David Sandalow

 

'Innovations in Global Transport' panel plus Keynote by John Holdren

 

Presented by

Atlantic Live

Underwriters

Presenting Level

Supporting Level

Upcoming Events

  • Fifteen Years Later:
    Are We Any Safer?

    The Atlantic will explore the nation’s homeland security to examine the strengths and remaining vulnerabilities of our security apparatus and our preparedness to prevent the next terrorist attack.

  • Health Care

    The New Old Age

    Since the turn of the 20th century, average life expectancy has been rising steadily. In the United States, we can now expect to live an average of three decades longer than our great-grandparents. As we collectively age, our societal understandings of the rhythms of an average lifespan have been slow to adapt. With nearly 10,000 baby boomers moving into retirement every day, The Atlantic will examine the shape of the new old age and its impact on society.

  • Culture

    The Atlantic's
    The Renewal Series: Cleveland

    The Renewal Series visits Cleveland to highlight how the city's leaders and grassroots entrepreneurs are responding to local challenges.