Kate Bolick

Kate Bolick is a writer in New York.

  • Single People Deserve Work-Life Balance, Too

    In every major city, people with and without children are quietly cobbling together more flexible schedules. We can all learn from their success.

  • All the Single Ladies

    All the Single Ladies

    Recent years have seen an explosion of male joblessness and a steep decline in men’s life prospects that have disrupted the “romantic market” in ways that narrow a marriage-minded woman’s options: increasingly, her choice is between deadbeats (whose numbers are rising) and playboys (whose power is growing). But this strange state of affairs also presents an opportunity: as the economy evolves, it’s time to embrace new ideas about romance and family—and to acknowledge the end of “traditional” marriage as society’s highest ideal.

  • A Death on Facebook
    Marcos Chin

    A Death on Facebook

    Intimacy and loss in the age of social media

  • My Mother’s Dresses

    Searching for the unattainable amid the comforting chaos of a bargain basement

  • Interview

    Enough with the good-girl shtick, says the novelist Mary Gordon, the author of The Atlantic's May short story.

  • Facts & Fiction

    A conversation with Carol Shields, the best-selling novelist and the author of The Atlantic's January short story.

  • Facts & Fiction

    For Peter Ho Davies, the author of The Atlantic's December short story, the challenge is to slip fiction into history, and vice versa.

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

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