Jean Johnson

Jean Johnson is a senior fellow at Public Agenda, a nonpartisan research and engagement organization More

Johnson is the author of You Can't Do It Alone: A Communications and Engagement Manual for School Leaders Committed to Reform. The book reviews opinion research on the views of parents, teachers, students, and school administrators. Johnson is also the co-author, with Scott Bittle, of Where Did the Jobs Go--and How Do We Get Them Back?, a guide to the national debate over jobs and unemployment; Where Does the Money Go?, a book designed to help typical Americans understand the debate over the national debt; and Who Turned Out the Lights?, a citizen's guide to the energy debate, all from Harper Collins.

Johnson has served on the Research Committee of The Ad Council, and is currently a member of the board of the National Issues Forums Institute, an organization which convenes citizens nationwide for non-partisan discussions on vital public issues.

Prior to joining Public Agenda in 1980, Ms. Johnson was Resource Director for Action for Children's Television in Boston, where she authored a number of articles on television and children. In addition to her work at Public Agenda, Johnson is a director of Sugal Records, a small, New York-based classical music recording company. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College and holds master's degrees from Brown University and Simmons College.

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