Kazakhstan Imams 'Outraged' Over New Allah-Brand Vodka

By David Trilling

A bottle of the new "Allah Vodka" will run you $4.40.

ean apr7 p.jpg

A Kazakh news segment on the Allah Vodka controversy. KTK.kz

Muslims in northeastern Kazakhstan have been scandalized by the appearance of a new brand of vodka bearing the name of God. 

KTK television reports that vodka bottles with the Arabic inscription, "Allah's strength is enough for everybody," have appeared in shops all over the city of Semey (formerly Semipalatinsk) for approximately $4.40 a pop. 

"Imams are outraged: They haven't seen a bigger sin," says the report.

"It's difficult for me to even speak about this. The only salvation for those who did this is to repent. After all, Allah is against alcohol. And here you have such mockery," Imam Bekzat Boranbai uly told KTK.

A representative of the Aktobe factory that produces the vodka denied intentional blasphemy, insisting the labels and caps are manufactured in Russia. 

Drinkers in the former Soviet Union often have dozens of choices when it comes to vodka, which enjoys pride of place in any self-respecting corner store. In Khorog, Tajikistan, I once saw Marlboro Vodka, with a red and white label that looked like a pack of the American cigarettes. Sitting next to that was Mercedes Vodka, stamped with the iconic luxury car emblem. 

This article originally appeared at EurasiaNet.org, an Atlantic partner site.

This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/04/kazakhstan-imams-outraged-over-new-allah-brand-vodka/255539/