A Massive Hovercraft Interrupts This Russian Day at the Beach

The amphibious ship coasted ashore in a village in Kaliningrad, a Baltic Sea port lying between Poland and Lithuania.

At first glance, it looks like a clip from a Jerry Bruckheimer film -- fun to watch, but more likely the product of a Hollywood studio than a real-life Russian beach scene. 

Or not. 

A video showing all 500,000 kilograms of a military hovercraft beaching among Russian tourists is apparently authentic.

Russian news reports say the amphibious ship, nicknamed "Bison," coasted ashore in a village in Kaliningrad, a Baltic Sea port lying between Poland and Lithuania. 

According to the Russian daily Komsomolskaya Pravda, a spokesman for the Defense Ministry said the hovercraft was simply beaching in "wild waters." 

"What people were doing on a beach in a region of military training is not clear," he added. 

The hovercraft video is just the most recent in a growing list of rather odd user-generated videos from Russia that have come about largely thanks to the proliferation of dashboard cameras.


This post appears courtesy of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

Presented by

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Global

Just In