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The government of Argentina is partnering with Iran to find out just who blew up the Jewish cultural center in Buenos Aires, which resulted in the deaths of 85 innocent people. Argentinean law enforcement authorities have long believed, of course, that Iran is responsible for the attack:

A "Memorandum of Understanding" including the creation of a "Truth Commission" between the governments of Argentina and the Islamic Republic of Iran and intended to resolve the 1994 terrorist bombing of the Argentine-Jewish Community Centre AMIA in Buenos Aires was signed today according to the Presidential web site.
The accord, which was signed in the city of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in Farsi, Spanish and English by Foreign Minister Héctor Timerman and his Iranian counterpart Ali Akbar Salehi, consists of ten points:
Among its most important passages the acoord calls for the "Establishment of the "Truth Commission" composed of international jurists to "examine all documentation submitted by the judicial authorities of Argentina and of the Islamic Republic of Iran. The Commission shall consist of five commissioners and two members appointed by each country (...) and they shall not be nationals of either country."
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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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