A Russian Fishing Hole That Does the Catching For You

Watch.

Screen Shot 2013-01-23 at 5.45.06 PM-615.png

Fishing. It's one of the greatest forms of relaxation known to man.

Not commercial fishing or trolling, mind you, but just good old-fashioned sitting and waiting for a tug from the end of your baited line.

Mark Twain's great protagonist invoked fishing to describe his love for nature in the folksy terms that helped place "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" among America's greatest novels. "It was kind of lazy and jolly, laying off comfortable all day, smoking and fishing, and no books nor study," the young Huck says reverently.

"Gone fishin'" is an American expression that counsels patience from both sides. Either you're trying to reach someone who clearly doesn't want to be pestered, or you yourself don't expect to be disturbed because you're away, you're not picking up your phone, and it's nobody's business what you're doing anyhow.

Now, there's a hardier breed of "sportsmen" called ice fishermen, who brave the bitterest cold to clear a hole on iced-over waters and sit in a temporary shelter -- perhaps "warming" themselves with an occasional swig from a bottle -- in pursuit of that same lack of adrenaline.

So imagine their disappoinment when a group of Russians came across fish spewing out of a "fishing hole" in the ice faster than they could scoop them up. Just about ruining their fishing trip, if you ask me.

The video, called "In Russia, The Fish Come To You," was uploaded to The Tubez, a channel on the anonymous Prochan video-networking site. So it's not clear where the video was made.



This post appears courtesy of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

Presented by

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Photos of New York City, in Motion

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Global

Just In