Welcome to Afghanistan's Future

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It used to be commonplace in Afghanistan that women living under Taliban rule feared execution following accusations of adultery, and it will one day be common again, now that the West has decided that it is too difficult to keep the promises it made to Afghanistan's women. In fact, it's already happening:

At the outset of the fuzzy video, which runs nearly four minutes and appears to have been taken by a Taliban member with a cellphone, Najiba is a peripheral figure, seen kneeling in the background. Her body is turned away from the camera, her head is shrouded by a gray scarf.
(...)
One of the Taliban says the Koran prohibits adultery. Killing the woman is "God's order and decree," he says. "If the issue was avenging deaths, we would beg for her amnesty. But in this case, God says, 'You should finish her.'" He concludes by saying, "It's the order of God, and now it is her husband's work to punish her."

Then someone else says, "Give him a Kalashnikov."

Armed with the borrowed assault rifle, the man identified as her husband approaches Najiba from behind. Several Taliban fighters can he heard whispering, "Get closer to her."

He shoots Najiba nine times. The third shot jolts her body backward, leaving it flat on the ground. He keeps shooting. Someone then says, "Long live the hero of Islam!" The Taliban begin cheering, and the villagers join in. One of the Taliban says, "Take my video, too," and can be seen smiling, with ammunition strapped to his vest.

If you want to understand the broader state of affairs in Afghanistan, I recommend reading friend-of-Goldblog Dexter Filkins' deeply-reported, and deeply-depressing, piece in The New Yorker, and then watching The Washington Post's Rajiv Chandrasekaran talk to ABC's Jake Tapper about his new book, "Little America: The War Within The War For Afghanistan." It's a short, and not sweet, interview, about how we've fumbled what should have not been fumbled. (Tapper, by the way, is also writing a book about the war in Afghanistan that will be out soon enough) . Here's the video of their conversation:

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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