Iran's War Against Israel and Jews

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International law enforcement agencies have broken-up yet another alleged plot against an Israeli target, arresting an apparent Hezbollah operative in Cyprus who was there to identify suitable targets for terrorist attacks. According to press reports, the operative was particularly interested in Israeli airliners. As Amos Harel reports in Haaretz this morning (I'm on a brief trip to the perfidious Zionist entity, where much of the talk is aboutf the flood of American officials coming to assure the Israeli government that they've got the Iran situation under control), attacking an Israeli airliner is an ambitious idea, and one that would undoubtedly trigger a wider conflict.

Protecting Israel's air traffic is high priority for the Shin Bet security service, right up there with protecting Israeli embassies abroad. Thus, had Hezbollah actually attacked a plane successfully, this would have been tantamount to declaring war.

Agents of Iran and its Lebanese proxy, Hezbollah, have had a difficult time lately killing Israelis. Law enforcement agencies across the globe have stopped Iranian plots in Kenya, Georgia, India, Azerbaijan and Thailand. But remember that Iran every so often succeeds, as it did, twice, in Argentina, blowing up both a Jewish community center and the Israeli embassy. So it's entirely possible that Iranian agents could succeed again, and then we'd be looking at an accelerated conflict. As Harel points out:

Israeli leaders have significantly lowered the volume of their own threats against Iran recently. But at a time when Israel's dilemma on Iran has been boiled down to a four-word slogan, "bomb or be bombed," a third scenario must also be considered: A poorly-thought-out Iranian move, in the Persian Gulf or elsewhere, could ignite a conflict even before anyone decides to attack its nuclear facilities.
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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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