The Epidemic of Sexual Assault in Egypt

More on the rash of attacks on female journalists in Egypt, from a Daily Beast article by Sophia Jones and Erin Banco:

What we believe many people around the world are unaware of is that these situations happen to female journalists in Egypt on a broad spectrum--those working in film, TV, print, and photography. And they happen to journalists like Natasha who are trying to make a start in their careers. The assault, though not always physically brutal, happens to one of us almost every single time we head out to report. It's not a conflict of trenches and flack jackets, but rather a physically and emotionally exhausting war where we are outlets for sexual frustration, economic instability, anger towards the "foreign hand" and "spies," and other excuses."

We want to love Egypt. We watched her transition, studied her politics, and tried to master her language. We have stood among thousands in Tahrir, and braved tear gas and intimidation by security forces in order to inform the rest of the world. At the end of Natasha's detailed description of her assault, she didn't throw in the towel and announce defeat--even some may see this as an entirely appropriate response. "Nothing, and nobody, will hold me back," she said. "When I'm ready, I'll finish this. The show must go on."


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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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