Musharraf: 'India is Trying to Create an Anti-Pakistan Afghanistan'

Notes from the Aspen Ideas Festival -- See full coverage

Gen. Pervez Musharraf, everyone's favorite former Pakistani junta leader and a perennially-future presidential candidate, is speaking on stage at the Aspen Ideas Festival now to David Bradley, the chairman and owner of the Atlantic Media Company, and said, in response to series of questions from David about Pakistan's support for anti-American, pro-Taliban terror groups, that, "India is trying to create an anti-Pakistan Afghanistan." Excellent answer, no? Entirely typical, actually. The last time I was in Pakistan, various analysts and government officials told me that Pakistan was outgrowing its fixation on India, but it's just not true. It's also not true that the army is maturing in its understanding of the role of civilian leadership; Musharraf, who does not speak for the army anymore (he's not very liked by the generals he brought to power), nevertheless captured the army's belief in its own righteousness when he told David, "The state is being run into the ground and the people are once again running to the army to save the state."

Pakistan's democracy has never been given time to develop -- the military has made sure of that, time and time again.

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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