Intel Chairman Mike Rogers Gets Right to the Point on Afghanistan

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I spent some time with Mike Rogers, the Michigan Republican who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, last week, and he was refreshingly blunt on the muddle that is our Afghanistan policy. Here are a couple of his thoughts (you can read more here):

"The administration is talking about negotiating with the very people we've been trying to discredit for 10 years. We've been trying to gain the support of people who are scared to death of the Taliban, and now they're scared to death that we're trying to bring the Taliban back."

And on what I fear is the coming abandonment of Afghanistan's women, he had this to say:

"We said to these women that we're with them. What are we saying to them now? I was in one of the first congressional delegations into the country, and I met a woman, a doctor, who spoke better English than I do. She has a U.S. medical degree. She took me to her hospital, a children's hospital. She told me that when she first heard of the fighting in 2001, she took off her burqa and walked something like 25 or 30 miles to the hospital. She had basically been a prisoner in her husband's house for three years, and now she was doing surgeries."

He continued: "And I get angry now because we're walking away from her. We're inviting the people, the Taliban, back, the very people who shoot people in soccer stadiums, who chop peoples' heads off. What message does that send to her? That she might as well put on her burqa and walk back to her husband's house?"
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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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