What China's Talking About Today: Fretting Over Jeremy Lin's Losses

"If the Knicks lose again tomorrow, I... won't eat breakfast."

lin march14 p.jpg

Jeremy Lin / Reuters

The New York Knicks' recent losing streak seems to have incensed Lin-sane Chinese basketball fans.

Anxiety over the Knicks' sixth straight loss to the Chicago Bulls last night broke out into nearly 10 million micro-blogs on Sina Weibo, the Chinese Twitter, yesterday.

As though Lin alone were responsible for the Knicks' chronic defeat, the hash-tag associated with the trend was #Hard for Jeremy Lin to come back from six straight losses#.

User 这个头像和昵称很拉轰有没有 wrote: "If the Knicks lose again tomorrow, I... won't eat breakfast..."

Countless other fans cheered Lin on with "Jeremy Lin jia you," the Chinese term that literally means add oil -- essentially, kick some ass.

Others micro-bloggers commented, much like sports commentators in the United States, that Jeremy Lin -- a relative rookie, despite his rapid rise to fame last month-- shouldn't take as much blame for the losses as more seasoned players.

新人王_  wrote: "It's not just my opinion, but Carmelo Anthony [Lin's teammate] -- that little loose hair, small puff of air, should head home and wash some dishes. Since Carmelo Anthony's return, Lin's playing has gotten weaker, and that's the truth!"

Some fans seemed to poke fun at the anxiety over the overnight success' recent losses.

Kev1n-Lau刘剑坤 wrote: "You mean, he's not a god? What now?"

Presented by

Massoud Hayoun is a digital-news producer for Al Jazeera America.

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