Pakistan, Up to Its Usual Tricks in Afghanistan

Shocking news from Kabul:

Pakistan's foreign minister on Wednesday brushed aside claims made by Afghan insurgents in a secret NATO report that Pakistan has been directing the Taliban's battle to regain power in Afghanistan.

"We have no hidden agenda in Afghanistan," Hina Rabbani Khar said in Kabul, where she expressed support for the Afghan government's nascent peace negotiations with the Taliban. "These claims have been made many, many times. Pakistan stands behind any initiative that the Afghan government takes for peace."

The foreign minister's statement is, in one sense, true: Pakistan doesn't do very much to hid its agenda in Afghanistan, which is ultimately to restore its ally, the Taliban, to power. For a brief history of Pakistani lying, please read this.

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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