The Pakistani Army Wins a Battle Over Husain Haqqani, but Continues to Lose a War

It comes as no surprise that the Pakistani army and its intelligence branch, the ISI, have forced Husain Haqqani to resign as ambassador to the U.S. Why would they want someone who effectively advocates for American aid to Pakistan to continue in his post? (I write about Haqqani's role as an intermediary between the U.S. and Pakistan here, and I write about the controversy that sunk him here.)

This is a self-destructive move by an army elite that specializes in self-destruction. In the short term, army leaders have solidified their image among the Pakistani elite as the untouchable decision-makers in every matter that counts. In the long run, their inability to brook dissent, or self-criticism, means that their institution -- and therefore Pakistan itself -- will continue to slowly rot.

More later.

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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