'Honor Killing' Fugitives: Pakistani Women Who Flee Their Families

Some shelters here can provide a home and protection for women who have violated an unwritten code that might bring their family to try to kill them


LAHORE, Pakistan -- In parts of Pakistan today, women are viewed as property and are believed to personify the honor of their families. If a woman goes against the will of her family, for example, by choosing her own husband, family members may feel that in order to restore their honor, they have to kill the woman--a so-called "honor killing." A few women are able to escape this fate and find refuge at shelters. Here are some of their stories.

Presented by

Habiba Nosheen & Hilke Schellmann

Habiba Nosheen, a New York-based multimedia journalist, and Hilke Schellmann, a video journalist for The Wall Street Journal, are currently producing a documentary examining rape laws in Pakistan in collaboration with The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

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