The Life and Rule of Muammar Qaddafi

From his 1969 coup to pan-Arabism, war with Chad, terrorism in the 1980s, later detente, and finally his downfall in the revolution that began this February

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AP

Muammar al Qaddafi, autocratic strongman of Libya, was killed during his capture by Libyan rebels this morning. He ruled Libya from 1969, when he rose to power in a military coup, until this spring, when he was overthrown by a popular uprising. His 42-year rule as the "King of Kings" was marked by suppression, warfare, and eccentricities. The International Criminal Court issued a warrant in June 2011 for Qaddafi and his son Saif al-Islam for their crimes against humanity during their fight to retain power this spring.


Qaddafi's troubled -- and often bizarre -- life and rule are chronicled in the gallery below.

Presented by

Lois Farrow Parshley

Lois Parshley is an assistant editor at Foreign Policy magazine.

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