Kabul Counsel: If You Hear Fireworks, Go Low

duck1.jpgThis in from a friend regarding my trip Monday to Afghanistan.  May be useful to others -- particularly the part about getting on the ground if one hears fireworks-sounding gunfire or an explosion.

You guys will be fine in Kabul.

Basically, trust your gut, but be a little extra cautious. If something doesn't feel right, then don't do it.

Remember there is a whole industry in Kabul meant to support visitors, however: If there is a loud explosion near you get on the floor and stay away from the windows for at least a couple of minutes, stay away from the first responders (ANSF and NATO) for a bit of time afterwards.

If there is loud and repeated gunfire near you (it will sound roughly like fireworks) get to the ground and find a low place or covered place to hide that is near you (turn off your phone too).

If you are in your hotel or someplace that could be a target, get out (preferably a window or non-traditional exit). Stay low and move at least a block or two away.

Be safe, but have fun. Clean your hands a lot.

Well, OK then. Onward and upward to Kabul.

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Steve Clemons is Washington editor at large for The Atlantic and editor of Atlantic Live. He writes frequently about politics and foreign affairs. More

Clemons is a senior fellow and the founder of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, a centrist think tank in Washington, D.C., where he previously served as executive vice president. He writes and speaks frequently about the D.C. political scene, foreign policy, and national security issues, as well as domestic and global economic-policy challenges.

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