Kabul: A Close Call Pic

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kabul bullet steve clemons.jpg


I look pretty ragged in this pic because it was a ragged morning, blogging about the bombings and gunfights in Kabul this morning.  The British Council offices in Kabul were attacked by insurgents on a national holiday commemorating Afghanistan's independence from Great Britain.

The bullet in my hand is one of several that came my way as I stupidly stood out on a patio roof blogging.  Wanted to share.

I am now in Dubai, heading home to Washington, DC and wanted to thank the hundreds of people who have written me today via email, twitter and Facebook. 

It has to be said that there is a contingent of folks in Afghanistan that think that there is a high fear industry in Kabul that convinces everyone that the place is less safe than it really is.  They are right. 

The security business in Afghanistan is huge, and fear keeps the contracts afloat.  But I spent an incredible day yesterday riding around with the Mayor of Kabul, Muhammad Younus Nawandish, and he has convinced me that there is a great story to be told about Kabul's future that is not dark and framed by bombs, bullets, and insurgents. 

But the other story that we saw in Kabul today -- one where many lost their lives -- and through which many Afghans just have to endure exists too.  They are both there -- and in a span of less than 24 hours, I saw both extremes in Kabul.

Now, I'm heading back to DC.  More soon.

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Steve Clemons is Washington editor at large for The Atlantic and editor of Atlantic Live. He writes frequently about politics and foreign affairs. More

Clemons is a senior fellow and the founder of the American Strategy Program at the New America Foundation, a centrist think tank in Washington, D.C., where he previously served as executive vice president. He writes and speaks frequently about the D.C. political scene, foreign policy, and national security issues, as well as domestic and global economic-policy challenges.

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