Japan's Prime Minister to Forgo Salary for Duration of Nuclear Crisis

Two months after a devastating 9.0-magnitude earthquake and tsunami hit northeastern Japan -- killing nearly 15,000, leaving more than 10,000 missing, and setting off the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl -- Prime Minister Naoto Kan said he will give up his salary until the nuclear crisis is over.

Kan's announcement comes on the same day that some of the residents who had been evacuated from the area around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant were allowed to return home to gather belongings. Kan added that his country needed to "start from scratch" in creating a new energy policy. The decision will abandon a plan to build 14 more nuclear reactors by 2030.

Kan said he would give up his prime minister salary which is 1,636,000 yen a month ($20,200 a month), but would still receive his lawmaker's salary.

Read the full story at CNN.

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Miriam Krule writes for and produces The Atlantic's International channel.

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