The 43-Country Pillow War: Photos From Pillow-Fight Day

The whole world celebrates feathers, fun, and the freedom to host massive, silly, fluff-filled events anywhere on the planet

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Students from South Africa's University of the Witwatersrand attempt to break the world record for the biggest pillow fight. Juda Ngwenya/Reuters


A sign of international unity and the joy of a good feather battle: Pillow Fight Day 2011 took place on Saturday, with fluffy/aggressive events officially scheduled in 43 countries from Greenland to Tunisia (and not one but two fights in an unrecognized state that has broken away from Moldova).

The Pillow Fight Day website contains some helpful wisdom and advice that gives a sense of how to hold worldwide pillow fights, and why:

  • Organizing a massive pillow fight is perhaps the simplest of free events or interventions, but also one of the most rewarding.
  • Our advice to anybody who has ever wondered is to never ask permission.
  • Do not use parks, please. ... This is not only to protect the park from huge amounts of litter, but also to protect you from the throes of banality and boringness. Most events in parks are boring.
  • The four most useful tools for promoting a pillow fight are, in order of declining usefulness, a mailing list, a website, social networking sites and blogs.
  • Soft pillows only!
  • The ideal pillow fight would leave no trace of its occurrence. This is not possible, however it is an ideal for which we should all strive.
  • Imagine that in any large city, anywhere on the face of the Earth, there may some day be free, fun, massive public events like pillow fights ... That is the era we dream of.

But pictures tell the story of Pillow Fight Day best. So here they are.

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New York City. Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters


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Hong Kong. Chien Mi Wong/flickr


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Taipei, Taiwan. Pichi Chuang/Reuters


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Zurich, Switzerland. Christian Hartmann/Reuters


More from Pillow Fight Day:

Presented by

Daniel Fromson, a former associate editor at The Atlantic, is a writer based in Washington, D.C. He writes regularly for The Washington Post. His work has also appeared in Harper's Magazine, New York, and Slate.

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