7 Wonders of the World: Strange Outdoor Art Edition

The world's largest shuttlecocks, Antarctica's only sculpture garden, a South Korean sex-themed park, and more

hakone-open-air-museumEDIT.jpg
As the weather warms, spending sunny afternoons in a stuffy art museum hurts. You shouldn't have to forgo your outdoor time to get a cultural fix. This week, The Atlantic and Atlas Obscura play outside. Featured in this edition of "7 Wonders of the World":

  • An open-air museum with an elaborate sculpture garden, stretching for over 70,000 square meters
  • Four 18-foot-tall badminton shuttlecocks scattered about the lawn of a Kansas City museum
  • Antarctica's only sculpture garden, with art and penguins but no plants in sight
  • Folk art environment, gallery space, and nonprofit showcasing the work of mosaic artist Isaiah Zagar
  • South Korea's only sex-themed park
  • Metal sculpture folk art lining the Kansas highway
  • A private collection of art inspired by cabinets of curiosity

Presented by

Rebecca Greenfield is a former staff writer at The Wire.

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