7 Wonders of the Natural World

The world's most massive living organism, Antarctica's blood-red waterfall, an eerie white patch of ocean, and the former site of the world's most isolated tree

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On Earth Day we honor and acknowledge this planet's natural wonders. So this year, The Atlantic and Atlas Obscura visit some of the world's weirdest and most wondrous natural wonders. Featured in this edition of "7 Wonders of the World":

  • What was, until recently, the most remote tree in the world
  • The world's oldest and most massive living organism
  • A beautiful multi-colored geyser under environmental threat
  • Three legendary, living albino buffalo roaming their pastures for all to see
  • A natural time capsule containing an alien ecosystem
  • A granite outcropping that a local tourism bureau doesn't promote because of its delicate ecosystem
  • The world's largest bioluminescent area, undiscovered by science until 2005
Presented by

Rebecca Greenfield is a former staff writer at The Wire.

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