The World's First Aerial Bombing: Libya, 100 Years Ago

Fascinating bit of history from the London Review of Books:

The world's first aerial bombing mission took place 100 years ago, over Libya. It was an attack on Turkish positions in Tripoli. On 1 November 1911, Lieutenant Cavotti of the Italian Air Fleet dropped four two-kilogramme bombs, by hand, over the side of his aeroplane. In the days that followed, several more attacks took place on nearby Arab bases. Some of them, inaugurating a pattern all too familiar in the century since then, fell on a field hospital, at Ain Zara, provoking heated argument in the international press about the ethics of dropping bombs from the air, and what is now known as 'collateral damage'. (In those days it was called 'frightfulness'.) The Italians, however, were much cheered by the 'wonderful moral effect' of bombing, its capacity to demoralise and panic those on the receiving end.

The rest here.

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Joshua Green is a former senior editor at The Atlantic.

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