Côte d'Ivoire President Gbagbo's Ties to the U.S. Christian Right

In the past few days, the press has paid particular attention to Côte d'Ivoire President Laurent Gbagbo's refusal to cede power and the ensuing violence he has caused. Many have accused him and his forces of crimes against humanity for their killings of civilians. Yet one aspect of Gbagbo's past has flown under the radar: his ties to, and support from, the Christian Right in the U.S.

That includes a U.S. senator and acquaintance of Gbagbo who declined to intervene in the crisis when asked by the State Department earlier this year, a former congressman who was hired by Gbagbo as a lobbyist, and a Christian Right TV network that ran a fawning profile of Gbagbo, even as violence engulfed Ivory Coast. The senator, Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma, today released a letter to Hillary Clinton calling for new elections in Ivory Coast, putting him in direct opposition to the view of the Obama administration, the United Nations, and the African Union that Gbagbo lost a fair election.

Read the full story at Salon.

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Miriam Krule writes for and produces The Atlantic's International channel.

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